News & Useful Information

  • LATEST UPDATES ADDED: 16-20 May 2022

 

REINFORCING THE ACADEMY'S PUNCTUALITY EXPECTATION 

Punctuality is vital to effective learning and the academy’s safeguarding procedures.

Lateness and non-attendance are extremely damaging to students’ progress and disruptive to the progress of others. They can also be indicators of wider pastoral concerns outside school (such as family issues, medical problems, or involvement in criminality) and inside school (anxieties about, for example, bullying or poor ATL).

The academy will take firm action to challenge lateness. Over recent years we have made several changes to support outstanding punctuality, most notably in the shift of timings of the school day and we now want to use our ability to beam students into lessons to support with this.

From this week (beginning Monday 25 April 2022), the academy will introduce a 'Remote Access Provision' room for students who arrive late without a pre-arranged appointment or accepted good reason. The academy's decision on whether a reason is acceptable or not is final. 

Late students will be based in in Study Centre 6 for the entire day where they will be able to beam into lessons. They will not attend lessons in person and will have their breaks and lunch separately from the rest of their year group. The remote lunch menu will be limited with only minimal choice and will be the same offer each day. 

The academy has invested in this resource to act both as a deterrent for those who did not take the necessary steps to be at school early or on time, but also facilitates an intervention by experienced pastoral staff who may assess and work with students to unpick any barriers which are associated with their punctuality issues. It remains the student's responsibility to be at school punctually every day and to lessons punctually during the day.

Excellent punctuality is essential to successful learning - be on time.

The academy gates are open from 8.00am; study centres and activities are available before school and the formal start to the academy day is 9.20am when all students must be on site to move to their form rooms at the first buzzer at 9.25am.

UNIFORM

The academy is also tightening up on some other basics such as uniform compliance now the pandemic restrictions have ended.

Students may be be sent home to collect or purchase uniform and will be admitted to school as soon as they comply, although as they will then be late without good reason, they will be admitted to the academy's remote access provision for the remainder of that day.

 

 

CONTENTS

REINFORCING THE ACADEMY'S PUNCTUALITY EXPECTATION  / UNIFORM (ABOVE) 25 APR 2022
CHANGES TO THE ISOLATION GUIDANCE: IF YOU HAVE COVID SYMPTOMS OR TEST POSITIVE 25 APR 2022
LETTER TO PARENTS FROM PUBLIC HEALTH HOUNSLOW including vaccinations for 5-11 year olds 28 APR 2022
OFSTED INSPECTION REPORT PUBLICATION 2022 28 APR 2022
CONFLICT IN EUROPE  28 FEB 2022
SUMMER 2022 PUBLIC EXAMINATION ARRANGEMENTS (UPDATED)  16 MAY 2022
CRANFORD'S RESPONSE TO THE PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID - ENGLAND  21 FEB 2022
ACADEMY TERM DATES 2022 (NO CHANGE)  21 FEB 2022
TIMINGS OF THE ACADEMY DAY 2022  26 APR 2022
CLASS TEACHERS AND TEACHING ASSISTANTS  25 APR 2022
OTHER KEY STAFF (REVIEW PENDING)  01 JAN 2022
RESPONSE TO THE PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID - ENGLAND  21 FEB 2022
COVID RISK & INFORMATION   21 FEB 2022
THE PM'S PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID (SUMMARY)  21 FEB 2022
MYRIAD MINDFULNESS PROJECT WITH UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD 21 FEB 2022

 

CHANGES TO THE ISOLATION GUIDANCE: IF YOU HAVE COVID SYMPTOMS OR TEST POSITIVE. NEW GUIDANCE: 25 APRIL 2022

The Government has issued two new generic guidance documents to subsume and replace Coronavirus specific guidance previously issued.

These are: 

 

SOME KEY CHANGES

Specific guidance for Covid-19 has been withdrawn or changed and schools are referred to the standard guidance applying to any respiratory infectious disease

  • If a child or a young person of school age has a positive COVID-19 test result they should try to stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people for 3 whole days after the day when they took the test. The risk of passing the infection on to others is much lower after 3 days, if they feel well and do not have a high temperature. They can return to school on Day 4 regardless of whether they continue to test positive or not.
  • If an adult has a positive COVID-19 test result they should try to stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people for 5 whole days after the day, they took the test. They can return to school / work on Day 6 regardless of whether they continue to test positive or not.
  • Anyone with mild symptoms such as a runny nose, sore throat, or mild cough, who are otherwise well, does not need to test and can continue to attend their education or childcare setting.
  • Anyone who is unwell and has a high temperature should stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people. They can go back to education or childcare setting when they no longer have a high temperature and they are well enough.

 

OTHER HEALTH ALERTS: SCARLET FEVER AND CHICKEN POX

There has been an increase in the number of scarlet fever and chickenpox outbreaks linked to early years and primary schools recently, including some where both infections are co-circulating.

During the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic there has been little chickenpox activity. Due to pandemic and reduced mixing a larger proportion of children in Reception and Year 1 age remain susceptible to chickenpox infection.

Guidelines for public health management of scarlet fever outbreaks

Free LFD tests and Free PCR tests are no longer available in England. Community Testing has ended in England. 

The academy will provide LFD testing for those staff who wish to continue testing twice weekly for the remainder of the academic year and may require testing by students or staff who appear symptomatic. 

The academy can take the decision to refuse a pupil, authorised visitor or member of staff if, in its reasonable judgement, it is necessary to protect other pupils and staff from possible infection with COVID-19. 

 

PUBLIC HEALTH HOUNSLOW - LETTER TO PARENTS

LIVING WITH COVID – INFORMATION FOR PARENTS

Due to high immunity in society, a greater understanding of the virus and improved access to treatments, we can now focus on how we live with COVID-19.

From 1 April, routine covid testing is no longer expected in all education settings.

Following expert advice, we know that Covid presents a low risk of serious illness to most children and young people, and most of those who are fully vaccinated.

However, Covid is still circulating in the community and can be harmful to some vulnerable people.

If you or an adult family member has tested positive for Covid you are advised to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for five days, which is when you are most infectious.

For children and young people, the advice is to stay home for three days.

 

GENERAL ADVICE AROUND RESPIRATORY CONDITIONS CHILDREN’S SOCIAL CARE SETTINGS.

Children and young people who are unwell and have a high temperature should stay at home and where possible avoid contact with other people. They can go back to education or childcare setting when they no longer have a high temperature, and they are well enough.

What are schools doing?

All schools should have in place infection prevention and control measures that will help to manage the spread of infection, including:

  • Ensuring all eligible groups are enabled and supported to take up the offer of national vaccination programmes including COVID-19 and flu.
  • Ensuring occupied spaces are well-ventilated and let fresh air in.
  • Reinforcing good hygiene practices such as hand washing and cleaning.

 

What can you do to reduce the risk of catching and passing on COVID-19:

  • Get vaccinated
  • Let fresh air in if meeting indoors, or meeting outside
  • Trying to stay at home if you are unwell
  • Washing your hands and following advice to ‘Catch it, Bin it, Kill it’

 

Vaccination

We continue to encourage young people to get vaccinated. If your child has not been vaccinated, you can read more about the vaccine programme www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/

12 to 15 year olds will still be able to access the vaccine outside of schools at a vaccination centre, pharmacy or walk-in centre.

  • 5-11 year olds are now being offered the COVID-19 vaccine in pharmacies, GPs and community sites.
  • On Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays 5-11 year olds can be vaccinated with their parents or parental consent at

 

CRANFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Picasso Centre (Bhogal Pharmacy): BOOK ONLINE OR WALK IN WITHOUT AN APPOINTMENT

Parents of 5–11-year-olds should also have received a letter from the NHS with further information.

Parents can book a Covid-19 vaccination online at:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/book-coronavirus-vaccination/  or call 119. 

Alternatively, you can find out about walk-in community sites at:

https://www.hounslow.gov.uk/homepage/223/vaccination_centres_in_hounslow

 
 

OFSTED INSPECTION REPORT

The report from the recent Ofsted will be published on Tuesday 3 May 2022 and copies have been posted to parents of pupils registered at the school.

The new report style is very short but the acdemy will seek to ensure parents have as much information from the inspection as possible, for example via this website about the more detailed feedback.

 

 

CONFLICT IN EUROPE

The situation in Europe is very worrying and will be even more sensitive for some, particularly anyone with family who are directly impacted by it.

Most of our views and the things we think we know as facts are determined largely by what we hear or see in the media, and they may or may not be wholly accurate.  

The conflict in Ukraine may continue for a long time.  

There is no certainty about how the situation may escalate or de-escalate, and even this uncertainty will worry some, particularly the rhetoric around the use of weapons of mass destruction.  

Whilst the U.K. is geographically reasonable distant from current events, some in our school and community will be directly affected and may have families or roots in the region.

There is also a risk of those not directly involved developing polarised views based on what they hear or see in the media.

It is important to remember that we have students with links to both Russia and Ukraine and to other countries affected by the conflict, directly or, for example, because of the unfolding refugee situation. No-one should feel ostracised by our community because of any protected characteristic, including race.

It is important that all our students are safeguarded, regardless of heritage and it is extremely important that we do not add to any of their burdens by what we say and do.

We will support all our children equitably. People on both sides of the conflict are at risk, being injured and dying. Our response must be humanitarian, not partisan.

The news and social media feeds are filled with the latest information and disinformation, some of it is very upsetting and worrying; and a lot of what is being talked about is unverified, even when it is claimed to have been verified.

Children listening and viewing distressing images can become frightened and fearful. Under no circumstances will the academy add to that distress by, for example, using distressing images or making distressing statements.

Real people are losing their homes, lives, family members, and futures. There is no place for anyone to celebrate the violence and heartbreak.

For some in our community, such conflict will be new, for others it may remind them of traumas past.

Sensitivity is paramount.

We will likely be issuing more specific guidance in due course but there are some general principles which should be adhered to in the interim.

  • Our stance will be humanitarian
  • Schools need to command the confidence of our whole diverse and multi-opinioned society 

Resources For Parents

Here are some background reading resources to help you think about how adults can support children with what they are seeing or feeling.

Current information regarding Ukraine

Supporting your child if they see upsetting content online about what is happening in Ukraine (Childnet)
https://www.childnet.com/blog/supporting-your-child-with-upsetting-content/

How to talk to children about what’s happening in Ukraine and World War Three anxiety (Metro)
https://metro.co.uk/2022/02/24/how-to-talk-to-children-about-whats-happening-in-ukraine-16163133/

Help for teachers and families to talk to pupils about Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and how to help them avoid misinformation (Department for Education)
https://educationhub.blog.gov.uk/2022/02/25/help-for-teachers-and-families-to-talk-to-pupils-about-russias-invasion-of-ukraine-and-how-to-help-them-avoid-misinformation/

Information produced previously about war and international violence

How and when to talk to children about war, according to a parenting expert (Independent)
https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/children-war-talk-russia-ukraine-b2023695.html

How to cope with traumatic news - an illustrated guide (ABC News, Australia)
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-12-23/illustrated-guide-coping-traumatic-news/5985104

Talking with Children About War and Violence in the World (Family Education, US)
https://www.familyeducation.com/life/wars/talking-children-about-war-violence-world

Tips for parents and caregivers on media coverage of traumatic events (The National Child Traumatic Stress Network, US)
https://www.nctsn.org/resources/tips-parents-and-caregivers-media-coverage-traumatic-events

The Key has created a free pack of resources for all schools which includes:

• How to talk to pupils: https://key.sc/3vFsVzU
• Parent information and support pack: http://key.sc/3IKqZtw
• How to adapt your curriculum: https://key.sc/3CaUgLD

How to talk to your teenager about the invasion of Ukraine (BBC Bitesize/Anna Freud Centre)
https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/articles/zbrdjsg

How To Talk To Your Child About The War In Ukraine (YoungMinds)
https://www.youngminds.org.uk/parent/blog/top-tips-for-talking-to-your-young-person-about-the-events-in-ukraine/

Worrying about Russia and Ukraine (Childline)
https://www.childline.org.uk/get-involved/articles/worrying-about-russia-ukraine/

Worrying about war and conflict Sarah Dove (Phoenix Education Consultancy)
https://www.phoenixgrouphq.com/tools

 

 

Schools have some freedom to teach about sensitive, challenging, and controversial political issues but need to exercise caution in difficult and sensitive circumstances where the boundaries of what is and isn’t appropriate and in line with the legal duties, may not be clear

When teaching pupils about racism, teachers should be clear that racism has no place in our society and help pupils to understand facts about this and the law.

Schools and other specified authorities are also subject to the Prevent duty under Section 26 of the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015. Schools should provide a safe space in which children, young people and staff can understand and discuss sensitive topics.

As a general principle, teachers and school staff should avoid expressing their own personal political views to pupils.

Political issues are likely to be raised outside of planned teaching and activities, mainly when pupils raise these themselves or ask and comment about live political issues.

 

EUROPE SUMMARY GUIDANCE

  • The conflict in Europe is very worrying and there is a great deal of heartache
  • There are children and families from both sides of the conflict in our school and community
  • There are also children from other countries which are affected by, for example, the resulting population movement / refugee situation
  • The conflict is a political issue, but it is a humanitarian crisis too
  • The conflict is in some ways more sensitive as it is topical
  • It is difficult to know which sources of information are reliable and that makes agreeing what are facts more difficult. Schools and Teachers need to exercise caution in difficult and sensitive circumstances where the boundaries of what is and isn’t appropriate and in line with the legal duties, may not be clear
  • There is a safeguarding obligation which must be upheld equitably for all, regardless of heritage
  • There are risks of polarisation and racism which must not be accepted or tolerated. There is no place for racism (or any protected characteristic) inequality at Cranford or in society.  Schools should continue to take steps to tackle racist and discriminatory attitudes or incidents - and condemn racism within the school and wider society. Challenging intolerant, racist or discriminatory views where these are shared at school should be seen as part of schools’ wider anti-bullying and safeguarding duties.
  • Consensus also risks an inherent bias. Schools need to command the confidence of our whole diverse and multi-opinioned society
  • Our response as a school and professionals will be humanitarian and non-partisan
  • Any coverage or discussions around this topic must be age appropriate
  • Sharing personal views within the hearing of pupils are likely to be highly unwise and potentially worse in this specific situation
  • Our prevent and ant-radicalisation duties are relevant to any conversations and teaching in relation to this conflict
  • There is no need to show images of the on-going violence, heartache and destruction in school, it is widely available outside school and parents will decide whether it is appropriate for their children to watch.
  • Schools should consider how pupil-led activity feeds into a wider sense of political balance across the school. They should also take steps to ensure all pupils are exposed to a diverse range of views in both the curriculum and wider school activity.

 

The legal restrictions on publicly funded bodies on the run up to the local elections at the start of May 2022, covering:The current situation for is further affected by:

 

  • promotion of political views in teaching
  • use of budgets and annual grants
  • restrictions on political activity
  • activities to promote political awareness to pupils
  • use of school premises for election meeting

 

Schools should take a reasonable and proportionate approach to ensuring political impartiality, alongside their other responsibilities.

 

This includes legal requirements under the:

 

  • Equality Act 2010 (including the Public Sector Equality Duty for state-funded schools)
  • Human Rights Act 1998
  • Prevent duty

 

Schools are also required to actively promote the fundamental British values of:

 

  • democracy
  • the rule of law
  • individual liberty
  • mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs

 

 

SUMMER 2022 EXAMINATION ARRANGEMENTS 

GCSE, A Level and Vocational Examination Attendance - Summer 2022

A range of measures have been put in place by the JCQ awarding bodies to support candidates taking GCSE, A Level and Vocational examinations in summer 2022. These include:

  • Advanced information on the focus of examinations for most subjects
  • Support materials for some examinations such as formulae and equation sheets
  • Changes to non-examination assessment and fieldwork requirements in some subjects
  • Optional content in some GCSE specifications
  • Generous grading in comparison to the June 2019 exam series, providing a safety net for this summer’s candidates
  • A minimum of 10 days between the first and last examination in each A level and GCSE specification. This will reduce the chance of a candidate missing all examinations in a subject.

All candidates are expected to attend all of their examinations in the summer 2022 series. All candidates have their own examination timetable, which they should keep safe and refer to regularly to ensure they are on time for every examination.

During the 2022 summer examination series a candidate may experience an issue or event which has an adverse effect on their performance in the examinations. This may be because it prevents the candidate from taking the examination or it may prevent them from demonstrating his or her normal level of attainment in an assessment.

Special consideration can be applied for if a candidate has temporarily experienced illness, injury or some other event outside of their control at the time of the assessment. It is therefore extremely important that students and parents/carers /guardians keep the academy informed of any situations that may have an impact on a candidate’s performance in the exams during the summer 2022 series. Contact Mr Ladva the exams officer at the earliest opportunity on 020 8897 2001 or mla-cc@cranford.hounslow.sch.uk or contact the Head of Year.

Candidates will be eligible for special consideration if they have been fully prepared and have covered the whole course but performance in the examination, or in the production of coursework or non-examination assessment is affected by adverse circumstances beyond their control at the time of the assessment.

There are two categories of special consideration:

  • for a candidate that is present for the examination but is disadvantaged due to circumstances on the day.
  • for a candidate that is absent from the examination for an acceptable reason.

Additional guidance has been provided to centres on eligibility for special consideration and the UK Health Security Agency’s (UKHSA) ‘Guidance for people with symptoms of a respiratory infection including COVID-19, or a positive test for result for COVID-19.

The UKHSA guidance is clear that a candidate who has tested positive for COVID-19 should stay at home. The candidate should not attend examinations for the time period recommended by UKHSA. This is 3 days after they have taken the test for young people who are 18 years old and under, or 5 days after they have taken the test for adults 19 years and over.

In the case of symptoms, the UKHSA guidance advises candidates to stay at home until they no longer have a high temperature (if they had one) or no longer feels unwell. A high temperature is 38C or more taken with a thermometer.

Symptoms of COVID-19, flu and common respiratory infections include can be found in the UK Health Security Agency’s (UKHSA) ‘Guidance for people with symptoms of a respiratory infection including COVID-19, or a positive test for result for COVID-19.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/people-with-symptoms-of-a-respiratory-infection-including-covid-19

 

The academy has lateral flow tests on site. Candidates are able to come to school to do a lateral flow test to check if they have COVID-19.

A candidate who is staying at home because they have tested positive for COVID-19 or have significant symptoms is considered to be absent from the examination for an acceptable reason.

Candidates that are absent from an examination for an acceptable reason will be asked to complete Form 14 – JCQ/ME Self-certification for candidates who have missed an examination. Centres will expect parents/carers/guardians and candidates to complete the relevant section of the form. The examination officer will give the parent/carer/guardian and student the Form 14 to complete.

If a centre suspects the authenticity of the details provided by the candidate and parent/carer/guardian within Form 14 the JCQ guidance states that they should investigate the matter as suspected candidate malpractice. Candidates must be aware that their results can be withdrawn, or they can be disqualified if they provide false information on eligibility for special consideration.

Questions and answers.

Should I come to school to do my exams if someone else in my household tests positive for COVID-19 or has symptoms of COVID-19?

Yes.

Should I come to school to do my exam if I have symptoms of COVID-19?

If you have symptoms such as runny nose, sore throat, tiredness or cough and are otherwise well you should come to school and do your exam. Feeling sick, tired or nervous because of an exam is not a symptom of COVD-19. You should ask to take a lateral flow test when you come to school, these are available at ‘The Hatch’.

If you have symptoms that are more significant and a high temperature of 38C taken with a thermometer, you should stay at home and not attend your examination until you no longer have a high temperature or no longer have significant symptoms.

The candidate and their parent/carer/guardian will be asked to complete a Form 14 – JCQ/ME Self-certification for candidates who have missed an examination. The examination Officer will provide you with the form to complete.

If a centre suspects the authenticity of the details provided by the candidate and parent/carer/guardian within Form 14 the JCQ guidance states that they should investigate the matter as suspected candidate malpractice. Candidates must be aware that their results can be withdrawn, or they can be disqualified if they provide false information on eligibility for special consideration.

 

Should I come to school to do my exam if I have tested positive for COVID-19?

You should follow the UK Health Security Agency’s (UKHSA) ‘Guidance for people with symptoms of a respiratory infection including COVID-19, or a positive test for result for COVID-19 which is to stay at home and not attend their examination for the time period recommended by UKHSA. This is 3 days after they have taken the test for young people who are 18 years old and under, or 5 days after they have taken the test for adults 19 years and over.

The candidate and their parent/carer/guardian will be asked to complete a Form 14 – JCQ/ME Self-certification for candidates who have missed an examination. The examination Officer will provide you with the form to complete.

If a centre suspects the authenticity of the details provided by the candidate and parent/carer/guardian within Form 14 the JCQ guidance states that they should investigate the matter as suspected candidate malpractice. Candidates must be aware that their results can be withdrawn, or they can be disqualified if they provide false information on eligibility for special consideration.

 

Will I be awarded a grade for a paper if I miss it due to an absence from the examination for an acceptable reason such as testing positive for COVID-19?

Awarding a grade through the special consideration process can only be made where you are absent from an exam component for an acceptable reason.

If you are absent from an examination you and your parent/carer/guardian will be asked to complete a Form 14 – JCQ/ME Self-certification for candidates who have missed an examination. The examination Officer will provide you with the form to complete.

If a centre suspects the authenticity of the details provided by the candidate and parent/carer/guardian within Form 14 the JCQ guidance states that they should investigate the matter as suspected candidate malpractice. Candidates must be aware that their results can be withdrawn, or they can be disqualified if they provide false information on eligibility for special consideration.

In order to achieve a grade for a paper or qualification through the special consideration process you must have completed the assessment(s) for at least one whole component within the specification.

If the examination is not a terminal examination (final exam) and it can be sat at another time, then the candidate will sit the exam at another time and achieve a grade for that component during another examination series.

Note A candidate cannot receive a grade for A level Biology, Chemistry or Physics by only completing the Practical Skills Endorsement.

Similarly, a candidate cannot receive a grade for GCSE English Language by only completing the Spoken Language Endorsement.

 

As in all previous standard examination series, a qualification award will not be made where none of the examination/assessments within a specification have been completed.

 

Ofqual and the Department for Education (DfE) have confirmed the one-off arrangements for next summer’s GCSE, AS and A-level exams.

This means that, for the vast majority of these qualifications, you should now have all the information you need about what to teach and how your students will be assessed.

Ofqual and the DfE have also confirmed the grading standards for next summer and when the results days will be.

We’ve summarised all this information for you in this email, along with how we can support you. I realise this is a lot of information, but I hope you’ll find it useful to have everything in one place.

Here are the confirmed arrangements:

ADVANCE INFORMATION

To help students revise, exam boards will provide advance information about the focus of exams for all subjects at GCSE, AS and A-level – with the exception of:

  • GCSE English Literature
  • GCSE History
  • GCSE Geography
  • GCSE and A-level Art and Design

Advanced information has been provided by the exam boards. Departments will share this information with students and will ensure that all areas of the specification are covered to enable the students to sit the summer 2022 exams with confidence.

 

OPTIONALITY

Schools and colleges will be given some choice about the topics or content that students will be assessed on in the following qualifications only:

  • GCSE English Literature
  • GCSE History
  • GCSE Geography

We can now confirm the options for GCSE English Literature , GCSE History and GCSE Geography

FORMULAE SHEETS

Students will be given a formulae sheet in GCSE Maths and a revised equations sheet in GCSE Physics and GCSE Combined Science covering all the equations required in the subject content.

As well as being provided to students in exams, exam boards will make these sheets available to schools beforehand for use in teaching and so students can familiarise themselves with them.

PRACTICAL WORK

There will be changes to the practical work requirements for some subjects:

  • GCSE and A-level Art and Design students will only be assessed on their portfolio
  • GCSE Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Combined Science, AS Biology, Chemistry, Physics and A-level Environmental Science – teachers will have the opportunity to deliver practical science work by demonstration
  • For the Practical Endorsement for A-level Biology, Chemistry, and Physics, teachers are allowed to assess the Common Practical Assessment Criteria (CPAC) across the minimum number of practical activities required for students to be able to demonstrate their competence. CPAC applications can be monitored remotely by exam boards.

NON-EXAM ASSESSMENT (NEA)

Ofqual published its decisions on arrangements for NEA in June, and we’ve already confirmed the NEA changes for most of our relevant qualifications.

GCSE MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES (MFL)

Exam boards will not have to include vocabulary that’s not on the vocabulary lists for assessments in GCSE MFL

Exam boards will include an extra optional question in the writing assessment to help students to focus on fewer themes in their writing.

Teachers and students should prepare for spoken language in 2022 to be assessed in the normal way, through formal speaking tests. There will be a contingency of using the published criteria to award an endorsed grade if it’s not possible for the formal tests to go ahead as planned.

AQA VIDEOS

With the summer 2022 exams fast approaching, we’ve created some helpful videos to remind you of the key things you need to know for GCSEs and A-levels this summer. The videos highlight what has changed for 2022, and what has stayed the same compared to 2019.

For some subjects which have more complex adaptations for 2022, or where we’re providing one-off additional support for students in the exam, we’ve made a separate video to help summarise the main points.

We hope you’ll find these videos a useful recap when preparing your students for the exams.

You can find a full summary of the changes for each of our qualifications, along with lots of other information and support for 2022 on our website.
 

CRANFORD'S RESPONSE TO THE PM'S STATEMENTS ON COVID RESTRICTIONS ENDING

The Covid risk is currently reducing, but has not been eradicated and further new variants that spread more easily will emerge, and it is possible that may be more severe, less severe or of similar severity.

Better transmition is a feature of viral evolution but the severity of each variant is a random factor. Omicron, thankfully, is less severe.

  • Our aim is to keep the academy open with as many healthy pupils and staff as possible in attendance but the responsible thing is to self-isolate if you are symptomatic and/or test positive and the academy reserves the right to refuse entry to protect others from infection in accordance with local Public Health advice.
  • At Cranford, we will continue to gently encourage the wearing of facemasks in crowded spaces, though this will remain entirely voluntary.  
  • The reason that we are still supporting the optional use of facemasks when in close proximity to others is to minimise the spread of Covid to others and in so doing reduce staff and student absence and protect the more vulnerable.
  • We have to live with the virus and we therefore need to continue to manage its impact on our families, the NHS and the academy for at least another couple of years and through more winters too. 
  • As a united community, we need to take responsibility for protecting our physical and mental wellbeing and continue the steady road to normality, so we will also embrace the opportunities made more possible by deregulation. 
  • We make our decisions based on risk and the risk and the advice from Public Health Hounslow
  • Based on the scientific and medical advice, we wholeheartedly agree with the government on the importance of vaccination, here and across the globe, and we will support further boosters, etc as necessary.
  • In particular, we join the PM, Professor Sir Chis Whitty and Sir Patrick Vallance in encouraging pregnant women to get vaccinated to protect themselves and their babies now that the evidence is unequivocal.
  • We also encourage those who have been reluctant to get fully vaccinated to keep their mind open and review their decision regularly. 
  • Vaccines are currently protecting people against serious illness, hospitalisation, critical care and death very well.
  • Vaccines are not very effective in preventing the transmission of infection.
  • Hence, to reduce spread we need other methods of reducing transmission, for example by wearing masks, worn properly indoors, when in close proximity with others and in crowded spaces. 

  • We are seeking greater normality, not greater abnormality and that is why we will take proactive steps to reintroduce assemblies, encourage more trips and events and return to the broad range of opportunities for all that were synonymous with education at Cranford prior to the pandemic restrictions.
  • Testing: Universal testing of pupils has ceased 
  • Universal testing of staff has ceased. From 1 April 2022 until further notice the academy will fund twice weekly on-site testing for employees who choose this and targetted testing of employees and students with symptoms.
  • Isolation: Those testing positive will be encouraged to isolate in accordance with the comntemporary guidance of out consideration for others and the academy reserves to right to refuse entry to protect others from infection. 

 

IMPACT ON THE 8 KEY COVID RISK REDUCTION MEASURES

  • TESTING, CONTACT TRACING & ISOLATION 
  • CLEANING SURFACES & REDUCING SHARING
  • VACCINATION
  • DISTANCE 
  • VENTILATION
  • BARRIER PROTECTION
  • GOOD HAND HYGIENE
  • SNEEZING INTO TISSUES

  • We are a community and need to act together as a community to protect health and wellbeing.

  • The journey to normality requires people to volunteer en masse when our protections become voluntary.

 

ACADEMY TERM DATES 2022

(with ‘the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee’ closure in lieu added)

 

SUMMER TERM 2022   

Monday, 2 May 2022                                      May Day (Bank Holiday)

Tuesday, 3 May 2022                                    Teacher Development Day (Closed for students)

Thursday, 26 May 2022                                  Academy closes at 3.10 p.m. for extended half term

Friday, 27 May 2022                                       Academy closed in lieu of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee (3 June 2022)

Half term for all: Saturday, 28 May 2022 – Sunday, 5 June 2022 (9 days)

 

 

Monday, 6 June 2022                                     Academy re-opens after half-term for all students

Thursday, 21 July 2022                                  Academy closes early for students

Friday, 22 July 2022                                       Teacher Development Day (Closed for students)

Summer break FOR STUDENTS: Friday, 22 July 2022 - Thursday 1 September 2022

 

Return Autumn 2022

Thursday, 1 September 2022:                           Teacher Development Day 1 (Closed for students)

Friday, 2 September 2022:                             Academy Open for Y7 & Sixth Form only     

Monday, 5 September 2022:                          Academy Open for All Years

Thursday, 15 September 2022:                     OPEN EVENING (Transition from Year 6 to Year 7)

 

TIMINGS OF THE ACADEMY DAY: 2022

ATTENDANCE & UNIFORM / DRESS EXPECTATIONSRegular school attendance is legally compulsory.

The academy’s expectation is for 100% attendance. This also means arriving in good time for the start of the academy day. 

The academy maintains high standards and expectations, including of punctuality and attendance for academic, logistical, social and safeguarding reasons.  Attendance and punctuality enforcement will be reasonably, sensitively but strictly applied.

Beamed / remote learning will continue for any student required to isolate due to Covid and may be offered to students in other circumstances who would be well enough to continue their learning and normal curriculum off-site at home.

The academy is careful not to become complicit in unauthorised absence and reserves the right to refuse beamed learning if a child should be in school.  

Cranford Community College is an academy with unform and dress code requirement as policy. These requirements are reasonable, cost effective published, gender neutral, reviewed regularly and made known to all applicants and potential applicants prior to applications.

The 'CONTACT US' tab on the website offers a perpetual mechanism for all year-round policy consultation contributions. The ATB will consider all pertinent contributions received in the preceding year / period when it reviews any policy.

Full uniform compliance is a reasonable condition of entry. Students must attend the academy in compliance with the uniform and dress code expectations.

A student will normally be sent home to acquire and don the correct uniform, purchasing the correct items if necessary, to return as soon as compliance has been achieved. They will be admitted without undue delay once compliance has been achieved. 

The period of absence necessary to comply will be recorded should be kept to the absolute minimum. It will be recorded as unauthorised absence and a sanction or other disciplinary measures may be applied depending on the circumstances, for uniform irregularity if appropriate and additionally for any other breaches of the Pupil Behaviour and Discipline Policy. Students are expected to accept challenge for non-compliance with politeness of tone, good manners, respect for authority and courteous good will. 

When a student is being sent home for any legitimate reason, reasonable efforts will be made in all cases to inform parents before they leave the academy site, but parental consent is not normally required. There are on-site contingency arrangements in place for exceptional circumstances where a child's age, special needs or maturity would make it unsafe for the child to be sent home to sort out the uniform irregularity. 

TRAVEL TO THE ACADEMY

Students should travel independently to school (Ideally walking or cycling), and not be dropped off by car except by prior agreement with the academy e.g.:

  1. If travelling from very far, agreed with their HOY,
  2. If entitled to home-school transport, or if they have a relevant Special Educational Need or Disability, agreed with the academy’s SENDCo
  3. If there is a relevant safeguarding need, agreed with the academy’s Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL) or Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead (DDSL)
  4. If there is a relevant medical need, agreed with the academy’s Designated Medical Lead
  5. In truly exceptional circumstances, agreed with a Senior Teacher (Pastoral) or a Head of School

PUNCTUALITY EXPECTATIONPunctuality is particularly important to a return to normal learning and to the academy's safeguarding protocols. It is not treated as a trivial matter and will be subject to robust challenge (See above). 

The academy requires every student to attend punctually on every school day. This means arriving early and allowing time for mishaps in the morning not to affect punctual arrival at school.

It is predictable that buses may be cancelled or late, so it is not prudent or acceptable to regularly take the last bus scheduled to arrive at school before 8.20 a.m. (earlier if attending a period 0 activity or lesson).

All students must meet the academy's expectation of early (at least on-time) arrival or accept the consequences of not doing so with grace.

ABSENCE & LATENESS: A EARLY SAFEGUARDING INDICATOR

At Cranford, lateness and non-attendance are treated very seriously, and may trigger our safeguarding antennae and procedures. 

Lateness is scrutinised on arrival by a designated senior member of staff. Lateness data, absence data and any patterns are scrutinised regularly and, in some cases, investigated forensically by the Designated Safeguarding Lead or pastoral staff in the remote learning centre.

Any individual absence or pattern of lateness (or absence) which raises alarm bells, is unexplained, is suspicious, or does not seem credible will be subject to investigation and risk assessment.

Absence and lateness which on the balance of probabilities is connected, may be treated as a 'joint endeavour', dealt with, and sanctioned accordingly. This may, for example, be where other students have been complicit in the arrangements for truancy of others on that day or previously, regardless of whether they personally have also truanted or arrived late. The academy will also consider whether such absence(s) may be related to organised exploitation.

Lateness and non-attendance may be subject to formal risk assessment because they can, for example, be potential indicators of involvement in crime, gangs, domestic violence, bullying and/or being at risk of exploitation. In such cases, the academy will report and work with other agencies to address the issues. 

Random screening or searching may be more frequent for late comers, who are deemed to be more likely to present other risks.

The academy also regularly screens and searches all pupils in accordance with its policies to give everyone confidence that unauthorised and illegal items are not brought onto the academy site and to give young people a good reason to refuse to carry such items for others or bring them onto the academy site or into its premises. 

These proactive and preventative measures are an important safeguard so that the academy can remain a place of safety and learning. Preventative measures are necessary to reduce the likelihood of ever having to implement measures retrospectively.

  1. Arriving late with accepted good reason / Essential medical appointments: Special arrangements for late admission / re-admission to normal lessons will be offered for any student who is absent for part of the day by prior agreement (for example, when attending a pre-booked hospital appointment that also could not have been rescheduled out of school time) if this is preferred to remote learning on that day. Otherwise, they may be offered access to beamed learning and counted as ‘present’.
  2. Remote / beamed learning will normally be available as an alternative to students with an acceptable reason for not being able to attend school fully on a particular day. This may, for example, enable the student to miss out on less of their learning by cutting out the travel time to and from school on an already shortened day. Engagement via beamed learning in these circumstances may be counted as ‘educated off-site' which counts as present.
  3. Students who feel unwell in the morning (e.g. with a winter vomiting bug. covid symptoms, etc.): should stay at home for the whole day and until fully better. If necessary, they should isolate until they have the result from a PCR Covid test. Should a pattern develop then it may be investigated further with parents so that the family and academy can look together at what needs to be done to improve attendance to 100% again.
  4. Late arrival without good reason: Admission to normal classes may be refused to latecomers if they arrive after the registration closure threshold time without prior agreement. The matter will be addressed in school by pastoral staff in the remote learning centre on that day (See above).

Such lateness will, however, also trigger a concern which will be recorded on the academy's new safeguarding system, CPOMS.

CPOMS is being trialled in the first two terms of 2022 and will be fully adopted from 1 September 2022. This system will involve supervisory monitoring by senior staff, which will also make the process more systematic and reduce the likelihood of individual human error in addressing absence or lateness.

Beamed learning may be offered, either on-site, or at home. For a student continuing with their learning from the remote learning centre on-site (including all students risk assessed as vulnerable), lunch will be delivered (restricted and unvaried menu only) and  the normal social times on that day will be separate from the rest of the academy. They will rejoin with their peers the following day when they arrive in good time. Students will continue with their normal classes and curriculum in the remote learning centre but will also have help and be assessed by pupil engagement officers. 


 

THE ACADEMY DAY 2022

Start Time

Activity

   

8.00am

Reception Gate open for students

8.30am

Formal Start to the School Day: Period 0 Lessons and Extra-Curricular

   

9.20am

All pupils must be on site

   

9.20am to 9.25am

Staggered movement to form rooms

   

9.30am

Registration 

   

9.50am

Period 1

   

10.40am

Period 2

   

11.35am

BREAK 1

   

12.05pm

Period 3

   

12.55pm

Period 4

   

1.50pm

BREAK 2

   

2.20pm

Period 5

   

3.10pm

Dismissal 

3.30pm

Period 6 Extra Lessons and Extra-Curricular

4.30pm Formal End to the academy day / Extra Curriculum may continue

5.00-11.00pm

Community Activities (Setting up may begin from 4.45 p.m.)

   

 

TUTOR LIST 2022: JAN 2022

SENIOR TEACHERS (PASTORAL): MEHMOONA YOUSAF (MYO) MTW  / RANDEEP SIDHU (WTF)

ASSISTANTS TO THE SENIOR TEACHERS (Pastoral / Inclusion): TAMMY JENKINS (TJE) AND PRISCILLA LEDLIE (PLE)

RITA BERNDT AND TAMMY JENKINS ARETHE DESIGNATED SAFEGUARDING LEADS

 

TUTOR GROUP

STAFF NAMES

ROOMS

YEAR 7

WEDNESDAY

Upper Gym

HOY: SEEMA MEHMI (SME)

A044

7T

ROBERT KEMPSTER (RKE)

B105

7U

OSCAR JOHNSON (OJO)

B111

7V

HOPE ELEY (HEL)

A142

7W

GURPREET PATEL (GPA)

A045

7X

ANGUS AUGHTERSON (AAU)

B107

7Y

MEGAN JONES (MJO)

B101

7Z

ELAINE LEIDSMAN (ELE)

B011

 

YEAR 8

FRIDAY

Upper Gym

HOY:  JOHN LENNON (JLE)

 

8T

HAMAD BINA (HBI)

A133

8U

SAHRISH SHAIKH (SSH)

S4

8V

ALEXANDRA MANOLE (AMA)

A141

8W

AASTHA SWAMINATHAN (ASW)

B019

8X

SUKHJEET KUDHAIL (SKU)

A041

8Y

IMDADUR RAHMAN (IRA)

B115

8Z

LUKE JOYCE (LJO)

S2

 

YEAR 9

TUESDAY

Concert Hall

HOY:  MILTON VENANCIO FERREIRA

(MVE)

 

9T

AARON LEVER (ALE)

S1

9U

FREDDIE PAGE (FPA)

S7

9V

DHANESH LALLCHAND (DLA)

A122

9W

BASHEAK BUSSUE (BBU) TTF

+ RORY O’HARE (ROH) MW

A144

9X

AMIRA GABER (AGA)

S11

9Y

KATHERINE PEDERSEN (KPE)

A102

9Z

ALHAM AHMAD (AAH)

A116

 

YEAR 10 WEDNESDAY

Concert Hall

HOY: BRADLEY KING (BKI)

 

10T

LOIDE GANDO (LGA)

A128

10U

KARAN PAUL (KPA)

B113

10V

NEELAM BOPARAI (NBO)

B103

10W

SD* HARMINDER PLAHA (HPL) TWTF + ILIAS KUBICA (IKU) M

S13

10X

SARAH BRACKLEY (SBR) MTWT

+ RAFAEL BRAVO-GOMEZ (RBR)

A126

10Y

KRISTY FOALE (KFO)

B002

10Z

KAJOL KAUR (KKA)

S5

 

YEAR 11

FRIDAY

Concert Hall

HOY: MATT NATION-TELLERY (MNA)

ASSISTANT HOY: KULSOOM RAZA (KRA)

 

11T

BARBARA LODGE (BLO)

CR4

11U

JON RYAN (JRY)

B022

11V

GILL TAYLOR (GTA)

A108

11W

BALJINDER DHILLON (BDH)

A134

11X

BARINDER DOSANJH (BDO)

S10

11Y

HARDEEP BHACHU (HBH)

A124

11Z

AMRAT ATWAL (AAT) MTTF

+ KULSOOM RAZA (KRA) W

B017

 

CRANFORD SIXTH FORM

TUESDAY

POST 16 HOYs (STRAND MODEL)

PRIYA AGARWAL (PAG)

(SCIENCE AND MATHS)

 

REBECCA CARTER (RCA)

(TECHNICAL AND ARTS)

 

            SCIENCES STRAND

C6A

EVELYN BROOKS (EBR)^

A106

C6B

AISLING McCONVILLE (AMC)

A103

C6C

MARGARET AWUAH (MAW)

A131

C6D

SHAWN D’SOUZA (SDS)

S14

C6E

PANKAJ DHIR (PDH) MTTF

+ RAFAEL BRAVO-GOMEZ (RBR)

A111

            MATHEMATICS STRAND

C6F

AVNEET KANG (AKG)^

S8

C6G

RAMANPREET KAUR (RKA)

A135

C6H

MUNA ALINUR (MAL) TTF

+ FRANCES GREEN (FGR) MW

A101

C6I

BHARTI PATEL (BPA)

B112

C6J

RIANNA FORBES (RFO)

S9

C6U

VINAY DHOKIA (VDH)

A127

            ARTS STRAND

C6K

AMINUL ISLAM (AIS)

A132

C6L

ALICE SARTORELLI (ASI)^

A113

C6M

BOBBIE MAHENDRU (SMA) MTWT

+ SD* TOM BELL (TBE)

A114

C6N

NICK FRITH (NFR)

A112

C6O

DAMIAN MILES (DMI)

A146

            TECHNICAL STRAND

C6P

SAFWAN SHAIKH (MSH) TWTF

+ CHETAN SHINGADIA (CSH)

S3

C6Q

HAMESH RATTU (HRA) TTWF

+ PERCY ENNIS (PEN) M

A143

C6R

SUNAINA TOOR (STO)^

S12

C6S

LAN YU (LYU)

A118

C6T

VERONICA CHOW (VCH)

A104

C6V

EVA CARROLL (ECA)

B021

 

 

 

THE ACADEMY IN 2022: COVID INFO

FEBRUARY 2022 REVIEW OUTCOMES 

Visitors

Only necessary visitors are allowed on-site during the academy day for the foreseeable future. 

InVentry visitor management system to be reintroduced at Easter 2022 with staff pre-populating invited visitors via reception.

Necessary visitors include:

Invigilators, Sports coaches, supply staff, contractors, regular consultants and ‘workers’, Ofsted Inspectors, NHS / Public Health staff working with the academy, trainees, private examination candidates (but 2m apart from CCC candidates), police, social care, colleagues from other schools, …

Events / Activities

Events and Educational Visits will be encouraged. Events are taking place in accordance with the general advice on staying safeBespoke risk assessment for each event will inform any further precautions and infection control measures necessary. Covid Marshall appointed to supervise some events and intervene if needed.

Exemplifications

In-School meetings: In person meetings will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.

Assemblies: In person assemblies will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.

Fixtures: will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.

Prayers: will continue in accordance with the general advice on staying safe. Prayers are not organised by the academy and the designated spaces are only made available subject to adequate voluntary staff supervision (male and female), set protocols and protection to teaching and learning. The upper gym and dance studio are the default location for daily and Friday prayers, except where these venues are used for other school organised activities such as examinations. Temporary Displacements: Whenever the upper gym / Dance studio is not available, designated A-block classrooms (A131, A133) will be used for prayers, two co-located classrooms have been agreed for use on Monday to Thursday and one or two additional adjacent classrooms will be designated for use as need for Friday prayers. Classroom occupancy should be no more densely populated than when a full class of 30 is present and masks are required throughout.

Academy Trust Board / MATB Meetings: will continue in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.

CPD: will resume in accordance with the general advice on staying safe.

Some planned international CPD and trips will resume in spring 2022 with trips to Italy (Staff / Students), Norway (Erasmus+) and Holland (ERasmus+) currently being rescheduled. 

 

Vaccination

Existing Academy Position

Get fully vaccinated (including boosters). If you have not yet been vaccinated, please re-consider now for your own sake, for the sake of others and to relieve the pressure on our local hospitals.

Act as a positive role model for our children by getting vaccinated yourself.

The majority of Covid patients in hospital and Covid deaths now involve those who have not been vaccinated. Don’t take the risk. Ensure you are also vaccinated against Covid and the Flu virus before the real winter sets in.

The academy will continue to encourage all staff and all eligible children to get fully vaccinated and those eligible to get their booster sooner rather than later.

Support and Encourage others to get vaccinated: If you have family members or friends who have not yet been vaccinated and are hesitant, please do everything you can to support them to overcome any barriers to getting themselves vaccinated.

Act now to keep your family and our community out of hospital in 2022  

Give Consent: If you have a child aged 12-15, please give your consent for them to have the vaccine as soon as possible to protect them and others, to safeguard their education, social development, emotional wellbeing and their mental health, to keep staff and students well enough to attend work / school, to support their schools in being able to normalise to a larger degree than otherwise, to open up clubs and events, to run school trips, to replenish sporting activities and competitions, to hold concerts, to promote extra-curricular and to support your child’s emotional well-being through a range of social interactions and activities which enhanced social and cultural capital. 

Do this for them – give them your consent. Young people over the age of 12 can get vaccinated through their school, at a local catch-up clinic, walk-in centre or by booking an appointment at a vaccination centre.

You can book online or visit one of the many walk-in centres and many are now licenced to vaccinate 12–15-year-olds accompanied by their parents or with their parents’ consent and can offer booster vaccines too. 

Booster Time: If you are eligible for the booster vaccination (or know someone who is), please come forward quickly now so that you have maximum protection. This is particular important in the older population and those who have underlying medical conditions whose immunity from the second jab has been proven to lessen more quickly than in younger, healthy people.

Don’t delay, quick action could save lives.

Pregnant women and those still unvaccinated will continue to be offered support to get vaccinated. 

It is envisaged that children aged 5-11 may be eligible to get vaccinated in summer 2022 and parents are encouraged to give consent for their child to be immunised to protect them and others from the worst impact of Covid infection. 

 

CONTINUING COVID PREVENTION MEASURES AT THE ACADEMY

THE SEPARATE ENTRANCES / EXITS SYSTEM

All students arriving before 8.30 a.m. must enter via the reception gate.

All students must be within the inner school site before 9.20 a.m.

The outer site will permanently be sealed to late comers after the threshold.

All students must arrive early for school. 

  • Memorial Garden gate: Y7 (Opens at 8.30 a.m.) - - Welcome to Cranford Community College
  • Reception gate: Y8 / Y9 (Opens at 8 a.m.)
  • South gate:  Y10 / Y11 (Opens at 8.30 a.m.)
  • Bridge gate: Post-16: Sixth Form (Opens at 8.30 a.m.)
  • Students are welcome to enter the inner site from 8 a.m. Anyone arriving prior to 8.30 a.m. is allowed to enter the inner site via the reception gate only (all year groups). Those arriving before 8 a.m. can wait safely on the outer site near reception until the gate is opened.
  • Routine temperature checks have been suspended. Random checks may still occur. 
  • Entrants to the inner site are encouraged to wash their hands on arrival
  • Parents should not drop off or pick up their children from school. Doing so is harmful parenting for secondary aged students as well as disrespectful to our neighbours and harmful to health and the environment. 
  • Children should normally travel to school on foot or by bicycle or, if necessary, by public transport but not in private cars.

 

  • LOANED ICT EQUIPMENT AND PERIPHERALS: Targeted loan equipment has been re-distributed to those in need, pending the introduction of a new ICT strategy for all. 
  • VENTILATION: The academy’s Air Conditioning System in Blocks A, B and C will remain 100% fresh air. However, crowded spaces will naturally have higher levels of pollutants and the air quality outside is poorer due to road (M4, A312, High Street) and aircraft pollution from LHR with aircraft flying over the academy since the termination of the Cranford Agreement.
  • NORMAL OCCUPANCY FOR ALL ROOMS:  Some larger rooms have been created in the summer 2021 building programme, new classrooms added, and other classrooms have been enlarged to give existing classes more space.
  • ARRANGEMENTS FOR THE BREAK 1 AND BREAK 2 ROTA FOR THE CRANFORD SUITE, THE DINING HALL AND THE CONCERT HALL EATERIES: We will continue to use three spaces and a rota for Year 7, 8, 10 and 11 to allow dedicated group sittings and less crowding, a more pleasant and civilised eating experience, greater spacing and less transmission of viruses, such as Flu, and other illnesses. The Cranford Suite will be dedicated to the Sixth Form at Break 1 and Break 2, making the other dining suites exclusively available for other year groups. Year 9 will have greater flexibility. 
  • STAFF CANTEEN: Dining furniture has been returned for communal eating. There are 4 microwave stations (please cover food with cling-film provided and perforate before cooking), 2 HOT water stations, 2 COLD water stations, 1 MILK station.  The shared fridge is in use. Wipes are provided for wiping down surfaces / handles. The Memorial Garden door will remain open to ventilate and provide an outdoor eating / meeting / well-being area for staff.  Additional cleaning will continue throughout the academy thanks to our excellent cleaning team. Two-way movement is restored throughout the academy. 
  • SCHOOL TRIPS AND EXTRA-CURRICULAR: We want to encourage a return to some normality and particular activities which promote good mental health. This includes overnight trips, including trips linked to examinations and coursework. These re-started before the summer 2021 break. The safety of each activity continues to be evaluated based on a dynamic risk assessment and appropriate precautions taken to maximise the trip or activity going ahead safely. We will seek opportunities for students to 'catch-up' on experiences they may have missed out on during the last two academic years. Cranford's Reward System will be adapted to facilitate the development of social capital. International Trips have been suspended again
  • LIVE ASSEMBLIES WILL RESUME IMMEDIATELY

 

INDEFINITE MEASURES

  • YEAR GROUP BUBBLES HAVE BEEN SUSPENDED: In keeping with Government guidance, the academy has suspended the use of bubbles although will encourage social distancing, where possible.
  • ADDITIONAL VENTILATION BY KEEPING EXTERNAL DOORS OPEN where appropriate and where this is not a significant security or safeguarding risk. Fire exits can, for example, be opened by Fire (stopping) doors cannot. Those in huts may be allowed to wear outdoor coats in classes when it is cold. 
  • TWICE WEEKLY RAPID LFD TESTING: Optional for staff. Tragetted testing for anyone exhibiting sympto
  • SUPPLY OF PPE:  To continue for the foreseeable future. The academy has adequate stocks.
  • CO2 MONITORS ARE USED where necessaryas a very rough proxy of air quality to monitor locations within the buildings and identify non-ventilated spaces which may need additional measures to improve air quality (if any). However, CO2 levels in many parts of Hounslow are environmentally higher than desirable due to road traffic and aircraft pollution in the area. Mask wearing inside and outside may also help to filter air pollutants from cars and aircraft exhausts.

 

PERMANENT MEASURES

  • A ‘DYNAMIC AND CONTEXTUAL RISK ASSESSMENT’ APPROACH Our measures will be reviewed regularly to ensure they are proportionate to changing risk. This will allow us to respond quickly if the need arises.
  • LIMITATIONS ON NON-ESSENTIAL VISITORS. Where visitors are authorised, all visitors will be expected to operate in accordance with the academy's health and safety measures. 
  • A SECURE OUTER SITE and develop the use of technology to ensure the highest possible site safety. The Covid vaccination centre does not provide ready access to the inner site.
  • REMOTE (ZOOM) WEEKLY STAFF MEETINGS (more inclusive) and enable remote access to some other face to face meetings.
  • ‘SCHOOL CLOUD’ PARENTS MEETINGS 
  • ONLINE TRAINING AND MEETINGS will be balanced with face-to-face training and meetings, normally offering an option of beaming in
  • CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF LARGER AND SAFER SPACES AND CLASSROOMS.
  • CONTINUED DEVELOPMENT OF GREATER OUTDOOR AREAS AND FURNITURE AROUND THE SITE FOR SEPTEMBER 2022

 

A NEW ICT STRATEGY AND PROCUREMENT PROCESS, to include an infrastructure which supports remote learning (full migration to MS Teams, portable devices suitable for home/school-learning for every student, laptops suitable for home / school-working for teachers and support staff, introductions of safeguarding monitoring software CPOMS, dedicated specialist equipment areas etc.) Other supportive technology (electronic message boards, No touch visitor registration, an enhanced website for better communication, etc.). 

 

THE PM'S 'PLAN FOR LIVING WITH COVID': 21 FEB 2022 (SUMMARY)

STATEMENT

The plan covers four main pillars:

  • Removing domestic restrictions while encouraging safer behaviours through public health advice, in common with longstanding ways of managing other infectious illnesses
  • Protecting the vulnerable through pharmaceutical interventions and testing, in line with other viruses
  • Maintaining resilience against future variants, including through ongoing surveillance, contingency planning and the ability to reintroduce key capabilities such as mass vaccination and testing in an emergency
  • Securing innovations and opportunities from the COVID-19 response, including investment in life sciences

The public are encouraged to continue to follow public health advice, as with all infectious diseases such as the flu, to minimise the chance of catching Covid and help protect family and friends.

This includes by letting fresh air in when meeting indoors, wearing a face covering in crowded and enclosed spaces where you come into contact with people you don’t normally meet, and washing your hands.

The Prime Minister has today confirmed domestic legal restrictions will end on 24 February 2022 as we begin to treat Covid as other infectious diseases such as flu. This means:

  • The remaining domestic restrictions in England will be removed. The legal requirement to self-isolate ends.
  • Until 1 April 2022, we still advise people who test positive to stay at home.
  • Adults and children who test positive are advised to stay at home and avoid contact with other people for at least five full days and then continue to follow the guidance until they have received two negative test results on consecutive days.
  • From April 2022, the Government will update guidance setting out the ongoing steps that people with COVID-19 should take to be careful and considerate of others, similar to advice on other infectious diseases. This will align with testing changes.
  • Self-isolation support payments, national funding for practical support and the medicine delivery service will no longer be available.
  • Routine contact tracing ends, including venue check-ins on the NHS COVID-19 app.
  • Fully vaccinated adults and those aged under 18 who are close contacts are no longer advised to test daily for seven days and the legal requirement for close contacts who are not fully vaccinated to self-isolate will be removed.

As set out in the Autumn and Winter Plan, universal free provision of tests will end as our response to the virus changes.

From the start of April 2022, the government will end free symptomatic and asymptomatic testing for the general public.

Limited symptomatic testing will be available for a small number of at-risk groups and we will set out further details on which groups will be eligible shortly.

Free symptomatic testing will also remain available to social care staff.

We are working with retailers to ensure that everyone who wants to can buy a test.

With Omicron now the dominant variant and less severe, levels of high immunity across the country and a range of strategies in place including vaccines, treatments, and public health knowledge, the value for taxpayers’ money is now less clear. Free testing should rightly be focused on at-risk groups.

The Government remains ready to respond if a new variant emerges and places unsustainable pressure on the NHS, through surveillance systems and contingency measures such as increased testing capacity or vaccine programmes.

Our world-leading ONS survey will allow us to continue to track the virus in granular detail to help us spot any surges in the virus.

Further changes being made include:

  • Today the guidance has been removed for staff and students in most education and childcare settings to undertake twice weekly asymptomatic testing.
  • On 24 February 2022, removing additional local authority powers to tackle local COVID-19 outbreaks (No.3 regulations). Local Authorities will manage local outbreaks in high-risk settings as they do with other infectious diseases.
  • On 24 March 2022, the Government will also remove the COVID-19 provisions within the Statutory Sick Pay and Employment and Support Allowance regulations.

From 1 April 2022, the Government will:

  • Remove the current guidance on voluntary COVID-status certification in domestic settings and no longer recommend that certain venues use the NHS COVID Pass.
  • No longer provide free universal symptomatic and asymptomatic testing for the general public in England.
  • Remove the health and safety requirement for every employer to explicitly consider COVID-19 in their risk assessments.

PRESS CONFERENCE (PM)

When the pandemic began, we had little knowledge of this virus and none about the vaccines and treatments we have today.

So there was no option but to use government regulations to protect our NHS and save lives.

But those restrictions on our liberties have brought grave costs to our economy, our society, and the chances of our children.

So from the outset, we were clear that we must chart a course back towards normality as rapidly as possible, by developing the vaccines and treatments that could gradually replace those restrictions.

And as a result of possibly the greatest national effort in our peacetime history, that is exactly what we have done.

Thanks to our brilliant scientists.

Thanks to the extraordinary men and women of our NHS and to every one of you who has come forwards to get jabbed and get boosted - the United Kingdom has become the first country in the world to administer an approved vaccine, and the fastest major European nation to roll out both the vaccines and the booster to half our population.

We have emerged from the teeth of the pandemic before many others, retaining one of the most open economies and societies in Europe and the fastest growth in the G7 last year.

And while the pandemic is not over, we have passed the peak of the Omicron wave, with cases falling, and hospitalisations in England now fewer than 10,000 and still falling, and so now we have the chance to complete that transition back towards normality, while maintaining the contingencies to respond to a resurgence or a new variant.

In England, we will remove all remaining domestic restrictions in law.

From this Thursday, it will no longer be law to self-isolate if you test positive, and so we will also end the provision of self-isolation support payments, although Statutory Sick Pay can still be claimed for a further month.

If you’re a fully vaccinated close contact or under 18 you will no longer be asked to test daily for seven days.

And if you are close contact who is not fully vaccinated you will no longer be required to self-isolate.

Until 1 April 2022, we will still advise you to stay at home if you test positive.

But after that, we will encourage people with Covid symptoms to exercise personal responsibility, just as we encourage people who may have flu to be considerate towards others.

It is only because levels of immunity are so high and deaths are now, if anything, below where you would normally expect for this time of year that we can lift these restrictions.

And it is only because we know Omicron is less severe, that testing for Omicron on the colossal scale we have been doing is now much less valuable in preventing serious illness.

We should be proud that the UK established the biggest testing programme per person of any large country in the world.

But its budget in the last financial year was bigger than the Home Office - and it cost – the testing programme cost - £2 billion just last month alone.

So we must scale back and prioritise our resources for the most vulnerable.

From today, staff and students in most education and childcare settings will no longer be asked to undertake twice weekly asymptomatic testing.

And from 1st April 2022, we will end free symptomatic and asymptomatic testing for the general public.

But we will continue providing free symptomatic tests to those at the highest risk from Covid.

And in line with the practice of many other countries, we are working with retailers to ensure you will always be able to buy a test.

We should be clear the pandemic is not over and there may be significant resurgences.

Our scientists are certain there will be new variants and it’s very possible that those will be worse than Omicron.

So we will continue to protect the most vulnerable with targeted vaccinations and treatments and we have bought enough doses of vaccine to anticipate a wide range of possible JCVI recommendations.

Today this includes a new Spring booster, which will be offered to those aged 75 and over, older care home residents, and those over 12 who are immunosuppressed.

We will also retain disease surveillance systems and contingency measures which can ensure our resilience in the face of future waves or new variants.

And we will build on the innovations that defined the very best of our response to the pandemic, including continuing the work of the Vaccines Task Force, which has already secured contracts with manufacturers trialling new vaccines which could provide protection against new variants.

Today is not the day we can declare victory over Covid, because this virus is not going away.

 

 

MYRIAD SCHOOL SUMMARY DATA REPORT FOR CRANFORD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Cranford Community College has been involved in the MYRIAD project which started in 2016 and is one of the largest mental health research projects run in UK secondary schools to date.

This has created one of the most comprehensive datasets capturing wellbeing information on adolescents in the UK.

Data was collected from 26,885 children and 679 teachers in 85 schools over 5 years and in total this meant more than 10 million datapoints were collected.

Tamsin Ford, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Cambridge says We can have a lot of confidence in the results of this study. I have been constantly surprised and delighted on how complete the data is at each wave of data collection. This is extremely important as the more complete the data, the more confidence we can have in the study.’

The figures below are a snapshot of the mental health and well-being of young people both across the UK and in Cranford Community College in years 7 and 8.  In Cranford Community College, data collection was in the Autumn term 2017 so before the pandemic.

The aim of this report is to give you an idea of how Cranford Community College looked at that time.

We hope this is helpful to you, but please be mindful that there are all sorts of reasons schools may differ from the average, such as proportion of girls, level of deprivation or whether the school is in an urban or rural area.

Also please bear in mind that there is evidence that young people’s mental health is changing over time, including due to the challenging last couple of years. 

Displayed on the next couple of pages are the results of 3 questionnaires from all the pupils in the whole MYRIAD project (85 schools).

Under each picture we have listed the results from Cranford Community College as a comparison.

If you want to find out more information about these questionnaires please follow the links:

1) Well-being was evaluated by asking young people about relationships, confidence, happiness, optimism – things that make up positive well-being.

This graph shows the distribution of wellbeing scores for the MYRIAD project

In Cranford Community College the results, out of 100 pupils were:

15% Mental health difficulties, 8.8% Languishing, 41.2% Normal Wellbeing and 35% Flourishing

Cranford Community College has a similar distribution to the overall total, with more pupils in the flourishing category.

 

2) Risk for depression was evaluated with a set of questions for young people about common symptoms of depression

In Cranford Community College the results, out of 100 pupils were:

9 probable depression, 16 some depressive symptoms and 75 well (non-depressed)

As you can see this was a similar pattern to the overall results, with more in the category that are well (non-depressed) in your Cranford Community College.

 

3) Social/emotional/behavioural functioning was evaluated by asking young people about emotional symptoms, behaviour, hyperactivity/inattention, and peer problems

In Cranford Community College the results, out of 100 pupils were:

13 Very High, 5 High, 5 Borderline and 78 Normal

This is again quite similar to the overall results, but with more in the ‘Normal’ category.

 

The size and quality of the study means we can definitively answer our key research questions about whether schools-based mindfulness training improves young people’s and teacher’s well-being – thank you. We have arranged a separate time to talk to you about these results. We look forward to contacting you again in 2022 when the full results of the MYRIAD project will be shared with you.

These findings show is that:

  • Firstly, the majority of young people are doing fine.
  • Secondly, a very significant proportion are experiencing mental health difficulties, at least to some degree.
  • When we look at what affects young people’s mental health, secondary schools account for only a small amount of variance.
  • We need to look beyond schools at the factors that affect young people’s mental health, and together address these at a societal level. These include economic and gender inequality, deprivation, exposure to violence, abuse and neglect.

Researchers will be in touch about communicating the main study results after they publish a series of scientific papers in the coming months – keep an eye on their website https://myriadproject.org/

 

NOTES

1   The data were collected in 2016/7. This was at the start of the whole project and before the pandemic. Data was collected via 3 questionnaires from whole school years - either 1 or 2 school years depending on your school set up and location.

2   These figures include cut-offs for these measures that show the proportion of young people experiencing different degrees of mental health.

Across the UK as a whole, we are seeing about 10-18% of children aged 11-16 experiencing significant mental health problems, but perhaps as many as a third reporting some degree of mental distress.

3  Overall, there were 26885 pupils from 85 schools in the UK who completed questionnaires in the MYRIAD project to provide this data, so it provides a good representation of the UK. We wrote this up as a paper which you can read here https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2021.02.016

 

 

 

 

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